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Tips for travellers

Exchange Rates

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Turkey’s Foreign Policy

Foreign affairs since 1950 Until the 1960s, Turkish foreign policy was wholly based on close relations with the West, particularly the friendship of the United States. Turkey sent troops to fight in the Korean War and joined the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO; 1952) and the Central Treaty Organization (1955). This Western-oriented policy derived from […]

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Turkey in the 21st Century

Challenges of the 21st century Turkey under the AKP In 2002 the Justice and Development Party (Adalet ve Kalkınma Partisi; AKP), a party with Islamist roots, swept the parliamentary elections. It came to power under the ostensible leadership of Abdullah Gül, since party leader Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was ineligible to serve in parliament or as […]

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The Republic of Turkey

Turkey, country that occupies a unique geographic position, lying partly in Asia and partly in Europe. Throughout its history it has acted as both a barrier and a bridge between the two continents. Turkey is situated at the crossroads of the Balkans, Caucasus, Middle East, and eastern Mediterranean. It is among the larger countries of […]

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Artemidorus

Artemidorus, (flourished 100 BCE, Ephesus, Lydia [now in Turkey]), Greek geographer whose systematic geography in 11 books was much used by the famed Greek geographer-historian Strabo (b. 64/63 BCE). Artemidorus’s work is based on his itineraries in the Mediterranean and on the records of others. The work is known only from Strabo’s references to it […]

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Who is David George Hogarth

David George Hogarth, (born May 23, 1862, Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire, Eng.—died Nov. 6, 1927, Oxford, Oxfordshire), English archaeologist, director of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (1909–27), and diplomat who was associated with the excavation of several important archaeological sites. Around 1900 Hogarth assisted in Sir Arthur Evans’ excavation of Knossos, Crete; in 1904–05 he led an excavation […]

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John of Ephesus

John of Ephesus, also called John of Asia, (born c. 507, near Amida, Mesopotamia—died 586 or 588, Chalcedon, Bithynia, Asia Minor), Monophysite bishop of Ephesus, who was a foremost early historian and leader of Monophysites in Syria. A Syrian monk, he became a deacon at Amida in 529, but because of the Byzantine persecution of […]

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Saint Timothy & Ephesus

Saint Timothy, (born, Lystra, Lycaonia [now Lusna, Tur.]—died AD 97, Ephesus [now in Turkey]; Western feast day January 24 [in Roman church January 26 with Titus], Eastern feast day January 22), disciple of St. Paul the Apostle, whom he accompanied on his missions; traditional martyr and first bishop of Ephesus. On his second visit to […]

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Theodotion

Theodotion, (flourished 2nd century AD), Hellenistic Jewish scholar and linguist and author of a Greek translation of the Old Testament. According to two early Christian writers of the 2nd and 4th centuries, Theodotion probably came from Ephesus in Asia Minor. He is reported to have adopted the Jewish faith after having been a Gnostic. Early […]

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Markos Eugenikos

Markos Eugenikos, (born c. 1392, Constantinople—died June 23, 1445, Constantinople), Greek Orthodox metropolitan of Ephesus (near modern Selçuk, Tur.) and theologian who led the anti-unionist party in the Eastern Orthodox Church following the Council of Florence, Italy (1439). After a classical and theological education under tutors antagonistic to Rome, Eugenikos at 26 gave his property […]

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