Who is David George Hogarth

David George Hogarth, (born May 23, 1862, Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire, Eng.—died Nov. 6, 1927, Oxford, Oxfordshire), English archaeologist, director of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (1909–27), and diplomat who was associated with the excavation of several important archaeological sites.

Around 1900 Hogarth assisted in Sir Arthur Evans’ excavation of Knossos, Crete; in 1904–05 he led an excavation of the Temple of Artemis at the site of ancient Ephesus, now in Turkey, and he wrote The Archaic Artemisia of Ephesus (1908). In 1911 he began the second major attempt at unearthing a capital of Hittite culture, Carchemish, in present-day Syria, and prepared a report of his findings in 1914. Sent to Cairo by the British government to help organize an Arab revolt against Turkish rule (1915), he subsequently became associated with T.E. Lawrence (“Lawrence of Arabia”) and in 1919 served as British commissioner at the Middle East commission of the Paris Peace Conference. Over the years Hogarth enriched the Hittite and Cretan archaeological collections of the Ashmolean and published Hittite Seals (1920) and Kings of the Hittites (1926). His Wandering Scholar in the Levant (1896) was a popular contribution to travel literature.

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